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           This page is dedicated to all Vietnamese sailors who have once served on the proud decks of the Republic of Vietnam Navy's vessels, and it is created for the younger Vietnamese generation who are curious enough and would like to know who we are, where we came from, and how we...sailed during the Vietnam war. Also a lot of thanks to François Bui for the idea, research, and the unique illustration; on this web page he is the captain!

"The Inventory of VNN's Battle Ships" is a long term project, we will add up the new vessel whenever it is available for posting. Please return regularly to check it out.


CommanderLogo

VNN Logo   HQ-10 NHAT TAO

Origin :
Ex-USS Serene (MSF 300)
Ex-AM-300

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Admirable Class Variant Minesweeper
Displacement 945 t.(lt)
Length 184' 6"
Beam 33'
Draft 9'
Speed 14.8 knots
Complement 104
Armament: one 3"/50 cal. dual purpose mount and one twin 40mm gun mount, six single 20mm gun mounts, one depth charge thrower (hedgehogs), four depth charge projectiles (K-guns), two depth charge tracks;
Propulsion two 1,710shp Cooper Bessemer GSB-8 diesel engines, National Supply Co. single reduction gear, two shafts.

HQ10 Ky Hoa

HISTORY

Sentry: A guard, usually a soldier, who protects an assigned post.

       Serene (AM-300) was laid down on 8 August 1943 by the Winslow Marine Railway and Shipbuilding Co. Winslow, Wash., launched on 31 October 1943, sponsored by Miss Maxine Noblett, and commissioned on 24 June 1944, Lt. James E. Calloway in command.

Following shakedown off southern California, Serene sailed for Pearl Harbor on 29 August. After arriving on 6 September, she performed ocean escort duty on convoy runs from Hawaii to Eniwetok and San Francisco into December; then participated in fleet and type exercises until mid-January 1945. On 22 January, she got underway to escort Tractor Group Able to the Marianas to prepare for the Iwo Jima campaign.

Screening Terror, flagship of TG 52.3, Serene arrived in the Volcano Islands area on 16 February and commenced sweeping operations in an area some 15 miles south of Iwo Jima. On the 17th, her division MinDiv 36, moved closer to the target area. Through the 18th they cleared the approaches to the landing beaches. As the troops landed on the 19th, the smaller YMS's were fuelled; and, from the 20th to the 28th, the minesweepers conducted anti-submarine patrols.

Returning to the Marianas on 5 March, Serene departed again on the 7th and headed for Ulithi, the staging area for Operation "Iceberg," the invasion of the Ryukyus.

Departing Ulithi on 19 March, she swept enemy minefields in the Kerama Retto on the 25th and 26th; then, after that anchorage was secured, participated in the sweeping operations preceding the main assault on Okinawa. On the 31st, she took up duty as a marker vessel and antisubmarine patrol ship off Kerama Retto. After the 1 April landings on the Hagushi beaches, she continued her patrol duties and provided assistance to damaged shipping. On the 6th she picked up survivors of the SS Hobbs Victory. On the 7th, she resumed sweeping operations in the sea-lanes in the Kerama Retto Okinawa area; and, at mid-month, cleared the approaches to the assault beaches on Ie Shima. On 16 April, she returned to Kerama Retto for availability; then resumed patrol and sweeping duties which she continued until sailing for Ulithi on 4 May.

On 28 May, Serene returned to the Ryukyus in the screen of convoy UOK 16. Early in June, she shifted from Nakagusuku Wan (Buckner Bay) to Kerama Retto, off which she performed patrol duty until the 7th; A week later, she resumed sweeping operations which she continued in the Mayako Jima area until the 23d. In early July, she escorted an LST convoy to Leyte where she was undergoing overhaul when hostilities ended in mid-August.

Then assigned to post-war minesweeping operations Serene swept mines in the Yellow Sea, off Korea, during late August and early September. On 7 September, her group became the Sasebo Sweep Group; and, on the 9th Serene commenced operations to clear the entrance to Nagasaki. For the remainder of the month, she continued sweeping operations off the west coast of Kyushu. In October, she assisted in clearing the eastern end of Tsushima Strait; and, in early November, she returned to the waters off Korea to operate off the east coast in the Sea of Japan. At mid-month, she resumed operations in the Tsushima Strait to clear the shallow waters at the western end. On 12 December, she sailed for home.

Designated for inactivation Serene arrived at Galveston, Tex., on 26 January 1946. On 8 May, she shifted to Orange where she was decommissioned on 19 July and berthed with the Texas Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Reclassified MSF-300 on 7 February 1955, she remained in reserve until July 1963. Then converted to a patrol and escort craft, she was transferred, under the Military Assistance Program, to the Republic of Vietnam on 24 January 1964. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1964.

USS Serene was named HQ-10 NHAT TAO in VNN service. 7 August 1967, North Vietnamese forces began to over run Coastal Group 16's base at Song Tra Khuc River, about 70 miles southeast of Da Nang. VNN HQ-10 NHAT TAO delivering heavy fire on the enemy forces. USS Camp DE-251 (transferred later to VNN and renamed HQ-1 TRAN HUNG DAO) and USS Gallup PGM-85 arrived in support. After several hours of Naval Gun fire one U.S. and two ARVN infantry companies arrived and launched a counterattack retaking the base. VNN HQ-10 NHAT TAO remained on station through the night provide continued fire support.

VNN HQ-10 NHAT TAO was sunk in early 1974 during an engagement between forces and those of the People's Liberation Army Navy in a dispute over control of the Paracel Islands. Opposited to 2 chinese ships #389 and #396, she took a direct hit from a surface-to-surface missle on her bridge and went dead in the water. On fire with her guns silent, crew from below deck cleared the guns and renewed the fight. The Chinese again concentrated fire on the HQ-10 NHAT TAO, again her guns fell silent as she began to sink. A few days later a Dutch tanker "Kopionella" and a Vietnamese fishing boat boat pulled only thirty-seven survivors of the sunken NHAT TAO out of the South China Sea.

Ex-USS Serene earned 3 battle stars during World War II and 3 during post-war minesweeping operations.

Bugle




VNN Logo   HQ-09 KY HOA

Origin :
Ex-USS Sentry (MSF 299)
Ex-AM-299

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Admirable Class Variant Minesweeper
Displacement 945 t.(lt)
Length 184' 6"
Beam 33'
Draft 9'
Speed 14.8 knots
Complement 104
Armament: one 3"/50 cal. dual purpose mount and one twin 40mm gun mount, six single 20mm gun mounts, one depth charge thrower (hedgehogs), four depth charge projectiles (K-guns), two depth charge tracks;
Propulsion two 1,710shp Cooper Bessemer GSB-8 diesel engines, National Supply Co. single reduction gear, two shafts.

HQ9 Ky Hoa

HISTORY

Sentry: A guard, usually a soldier, who protects an assigned post.

       Sentry (AM-299) was laid down on 16 May 1943 by the Winslow Marine Railway and Shipbuilding Co., Seattle, Wash.; launched on 15 August 1943 sponsored by Miss Nanette L. Pratt, and commissioned on 30 May 1944, Lt. Thomas R. Fonick in command.

After shakedown, Sentry sailed from San Francisco on 28 August 1944 and joined the 7th Fleet at Manus on 6 October for the Leyte invasion. She arrived off the Leyte beaches on 17 October and carried out a three- day pre-invasion sweep. She continued sweeping during and after the initial landings on 20 October until joining the transports on 24 October to provide anti-aircraft support.

Sentry remained in Leyte Gulf for the next six weeks then participated in most of the subsequent landings in the Philippines. With her division, Mine Division 34 she carried out pre-invasion sweeps at Ormoc Bay on 6 December 1944, Mindoro Island on 14 December Lingayen Gulf on 6 January 1945, and Zambales and Subic Bay on 29-31 January. For all but the Ormoc landings, she remained on the scene after the initial troop landings, helping extend the mineswept areas and providing antisubmarine and antiaircraft protection to the transports. Few mines were encountered, but kamikaze resistance was intense, and the ships saw much anti-aircraft action.

On 13 February, Sentry and her division began preinvasion sweeps in Manila Bay in preparation for the landings at Mariveles and Corregidor. While sweeping off Corregidor on the 14th, the minesweepers came within 5,000 yards of the island and were repeatedly straddled by Japanese fire before supporting ships silenced the enemy's guns. Sentry continued sweeping in Manila Bay through 19 February, and her division earned a Navy Unit Commendation for the operation.

During the next two and one-half months, Sentry carried out various local sweeps in support of mop-up operations in the Philippines, the most notable being a pre-assault sweep for the landings at Legaspi, Luzon on 1 April, and an 8-day sweep in the Sulu Sea off Palawan beginning on 22 April. On 9 May, the ship arrived at Morotai to prepare for operations in the Netherlands East Indies.

Between 7 and 18 June, Sentry supported the landings at Brunei Bay, Borneo; and, between 22 June and 15 July, she helped clear the way for the assault at Balikpapan. During both operations, the minesweepers came under fire from shore batteries; and one ship, Salute, was sunk by a mine on 8 June. Sentry's task unit received a Presidential Unit Citation for its service off Borneo between 15 June and 1 July 1945.

After overhaul at Subic Bay, Sentry departed the Philippines on 8 September and arrived at Sasebo Japan, on 20 October, having accepted the surrender of the Japanese army garrison of Shan Zaki in the Ryukyus while en route. In the following weeks, she swept Japanese minefields in the Ryukyus, the Tsushima Strait, and the Van Diemen Strait. She sailed from Sasebo on 9 December for the United States. Arriving at Orange, Texas, on 2 April 1946, she was decommissioned there on 19 June 1946 and placed in reserve. Her classification was changed from AM-299 to MSF-299, effective 7 February 1955. Sentry was struck from the Navy list on 1 February 1962 and transferred to the Republic of Vietnam on 31 August 1962 as HQ-09 KY HOA in the South Vietnam Navy. The fate of the HQ-09 KY HOA is unknown, but she apparently never left Vietnam.

In addition to her six battle stars for World War II service, Sentry was also awarded a Navy Unit Commendation and a Presidential Unit Citation.





VNN Logo   HQ-08 CHI LANG II

Origin :
Ex-USS Gayety (MSF 239)
Ex-AM-239

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Admirable Class Variant Minesweeper
Displacement 945 t.(lt)
Length 184' 6"
Beam 33'
Draft 9'
Speed 14.8 knots
Complement 104
Armament: one 3"/50 cal. dual purpose mount and one twin 40mm gun mount, six single 20mm gun mounts, one depth charge thrower (hedgehogs), four depth charge projectiles (K-guns), two depth charge tracks;
Propulsion two 1,710shp Cooper Bessemer GSB-8 diesel engines, National Supply Co. single reduction gear, two shafts.

HQ8 Chi Lang

HISTORY

Gayety: Merriment or jollity.

        Gayety (AM-239) was laid down 14 November 1943 by the Winslow Marine Railway & Shipbuilding Co. of Winslow, Wash.; launched 19 March 1944 sponsored by Miss Janice Morgan and commissioned 23 September 1945, Lt. Comdr. John R. Row in command.

After shakedown out of San Pedro and San Diego, Gayety arrived Pearl Harbor 4 January 1945 Following training and escort duty she sailed west for the invasion of Okinawa via Eniwetok, Saipan, and Ulithi. She sortied from Saipan 25 March with a convoy bound for Okinawa and arrived off Okinawa 1 April in time for the first amphibious assault on that strategic island, the doorway to Japan. In the ensuing weeks, Gayety swept minefields and made ASW patrols in the Ryukyus. On 14 April she was as attacked by a Japanese torpedo bomber coming in low and fast to starboard The plane launched a torpedo which Gayety left astern, but she was shaken from bow to stern when it exploded 150 yards away.

On 4 May, following a kamikaze attack on nearby Hopkins, another plane made a suicide run on Gayety, coming in from starboard. Her automatic weapons riddled the plane that passed close over her fantail before crashing into the sea 30 yards off the port quarter. Later in the same day the ship was attacked by a Japanese "Baka" bomb, a 4,700-pound bomb propelled by a rocket and guided by a human pilot at speeds up to 600 miles per hour. One of these deadly weapons thundered in at an estimated 400 knots made a low altitude run on several of the smaller minesweepers Gayety was shepherding, and then turned toward Gayety for a suicide crash. The ship's gunners, unflinchingly manning their weapons, sent up an umbrella of automatic fire which blew off the Baka's cowling ring; seconds later it disintegrated rapidly, tumbling end over end through the air, and crashed into the sea 15 yards off Gayety's port bow. Shrapnel rained on her decks, knocking out the port 40mm. gun and wounding three men but the ship continued her duties undaunted.

On 27 May while continuing to support the Okinawa campaign, she suffered a near-miss from a 500-pound bomb which exploded just astern. Five men were killed and two wounded by flying debris, and the fantail burst into flames. Quick damage control however followed by repairs at Kerama Retto, soon put her back in fighting shape; and she resumed minesweeping off Okinawa and, subsequently, shifted operations to the approaches of the Japanese home islands.

After Japan surrendered and occupation forces had taken control of the conquered Empire, Gayety stood out from Japan 20 November for the United States via Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor reaching San Diego 19 December 1945 and thence sailing via the Panama Canal to Orange, Tex., where she decommissioned June 1946 and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

Gayety recommissioned 11 May 1951, Lt. Percy W. Rairden Jr., in command and moored at Charleston, N.C., 29 May. Until 1954 she was based at either Charleston or Norfolk, Va., as a training ship, with a visit to Vieques Island, P.R., in the fall of 1951 for exercises. She returned to Orange, Tex., 3 January a 1954 and decommissioned 1 March 1954, re-entering the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Gayety was as reclassified MSF-239 in February 1955 and was transferred to the Republic of Vietnam 17 April 1962. She serves the Vietnamese Navy as HQ-08 CHI LANG II.

In the Fall of South Vietnam in 1975, HQ-08 CHI LANG II escaped from Vietnam to Subic Bay with her crew. She was then transferred to the Philippine Navy as MAGAT SALAMAT (PS-19) in 1975.





VNN Logo   HQ-07 DONG DA II

Origin :
Ex-USS Crestview (PCE 895)
Ex-PCE-895

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: PCE-827Class - Patrol Craft Escort
Displacement: 640 t.(lt)
Length 184' 6"
Beam 33'
Draft 9'
Speed 15.7 knots
Complement 99
Armament: one single 3"/50 gun mount, three twin 40mm gun mounts, two dct, four dcp, one dcp (hh);
Propulsion two 2,000shp General Motors 12-278A diesel engines, Falk single reduction gear, two shafts.

HQ7 Dong Da

HISTORY

        Laid down, 2 December 1942 by the Willamette Iron and Steel Corp., Portland, OR; Launched, 18 May 1943; Commissioned USS PCE-895, 30 October 1944; Named Crestview, 15 February 1956.

Transferred to South Vietnam Navy, 29 November 1961 as HQ-07 DONG DA II.

Escaped to the Philippines in 1975 after the Fall of South Vietnam, transferred to the Philippine Navy and renamed Sultan Kudarat (PS 22). Fate unknown.





VNN Logo   HQ-6 TRAN QUOC TOAN\

Origin :
USS Wachapreague AVP-56 / AGP-8
USCGC McCulloch WAVP-386 / WHEC-386

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Barnegat - Small Seaplane Tender
Displacement: 1,766 t.(lt) 2,470.3 t.(fl)
Length: 310' 1/4"
Beam: 41'
Draft: 12' 5"
Speed: 17.6 knots, 9,700 nautical mile range - 11.7 knots, 16,000 nautical mile range
Fuel Capacity: 166,430
USN Complement 215
USCG Complement 10 officers, 3 warrant officers, 138 enlisted
Armament USN: one single 5"/38, one quad 40mm gun mount, two dual 40mm gun mounts, four dual 20mm gun mounts
Armament USCG: one single 5"/38 Mk 30-65 dual purpose gun mount, one Mk 52-3 director, one Mk 26-01 fire control radar, two .50 caliber MG's, one x Mk 4 Mod 0 hedgehog A/S projector, one Mk 11 Mod 0 A/S projector, two Mk 32 Mod 5 torpedo tubes (3 tubes per unit)
Electronics: Radar: SPS-23, SPS-29D; Sonar: SQS-1 Propulsion Fairbanks-Morse, direct reversing diesels, two shafts, 6,400hp

HQ6 Tran Quoc Toan

HISTORY

       Wachapreague: An inlet on the eastern shore of the state of Virginia.

Renamed McCullough (in memory of Hugh McCulloch, be the 27th Secretary of the Treasury. He served under President Abraham Lincoln and President Andrew Johnson from March 9, 1865 until March 3, 1869. He also served as the 36th Secretary of the Treasury from October 31, 1884 until March 7, 1885 under Presidents Chester A. Arthur and Grover Cleveland).

This cutter was originally named Wachapreague. The USS McCullough was homeported in Boston, MA from 16 November 1946 to July 1966. From July 1966 through 21 June 1972, the ship was stationed in Wilmington, NC. At both stations, the cutter was used for ocean station, law enforcement, and search and rescue operations.

While patrolling ocean station "Bravo" off the Labrador coast in January 1959, raging winter cold seas cracked the McCulloch' s main decks and swept one crewman overboard. In spite of that harried experience, she managed to reach Argentia without further mishap. On April 22, 1966, the McCulloch was awarded a Unit Commendation with ceremonies held at Boston. That entitled her crew of 144 to wear the Unit Commendation Bar. The crew was cited for outstanding service during the Cuban Exodus while assigned to stand watch and rescue refugees in the Florida Straits during October and November 1965. In early November 1965, the McCullough rescued 280 Cuban refugees from small craft in the Florida Strait and carried them to Key West, FL.

During this patrol the cutter was under the command of Commander Frank Barnett, USCG, who was in tactical command of 12 cutters and four planes assigned to the Cuban Patrol. He was responsible for the safety of thousands of Cubans who chanced the hazardous 90-miles rough passage from Camarioca Cuba to Key West Fla., many in overcrowded and unseaworthy craft, most of them handled by totally inexperienced persons.

On 17 June 1970, the cutter helped fighting a fire on M/V Tsui Yung in Wilmington, NC. While stationed at Wilmington N. C., the McCulloch continued her assignments on ocean station patrol and search and rescue as well as special missions until her final days.

In April 1972, the McCulloch with two sister cutters, the USCGC Absecon (WHEC-374) and Chincoteague (WHEC-375), was deployed as Coast Guard Squadron II, with crews comprised mainly of reservists. They were originally scheduled to sail to Subic Bay, Philippine Islands, but were diverted to the Navy base at Apra Harbor, Guam. Eventually the three sisters were transferred to the Government of the Republic of Vietnam. After her transfer to South Vietnam Navy in the Vietnamization Program, the ship was renamed HQ-6 TRAN QUOC TOAN.

After Saigon fell to the North Vietnamese army in April 1975, the HQ-6 TRAN QUOC TOAN escaped to Subic Bay, Philippines with her crew and refugees. A U.S. Coast Guard team inspected the surviving WHEC's on 22-23 May, 1975, including the former USS McCulloch. One of the inspectors noted: "These vessels brought in several hundred refugees and are generally rat-infested. They are in a filthy, deplorable condition. Below decks generally would compare with a garbage scow."

After the McCulloch was cleaned, repaired, and returned to service the U.S. Navy transferred her to the Philippine Navy. The Philippine Navy commissioned her as the RPS #8 GREGORIO DE PILAR on 7 February 1977. She served until April 1990 when she was decommissioned [and scrapped?].





VNN Logo   HQ-5 TRAN BINH TRONG

Origin :
USS Chincoteague (AVP-24)
USCGC Chincoteague (WAVP-375) (WHEC-375)

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Barnegat - Small Seaplane Tender
Displacement: 1,766 t.(lt) 2,528 t.(fl)
Length 310' 9½"
Beam 41'
Draft 12' 5"
Speed 17 knots, 10,000 nautical mile range - 11.5 knots, 15,000 nautical mile range
Fuel Capacity 166,430
USN Complement 215
USCG Complement 10 officers, 3 warrant officers, 138 enlisted
Armament USN: one single 5"/38, one quad 40mm gun mount, two dual 40mm gun mounts, four dual 20mm gun mounts
Armament USCG: USCG one single 5"/38 MK 30-70 dual purpose gun mount, one MK 26 Mod 1 Fire Control Radar, one MK 10 Mod 1 A/S Projector, two MK32 Mod 5 torpedo Tubes
Electronics: Radar: SPS-23, SPS-29B; SPS-4B; SPS-52; Sonar: SQS-1 Propulsion Fairbanks-Morse, direct reversing diesels, two shafts, 6,400hp

HQ5 Tran Binh Trong

HISTORY

       Chincoteague: A bay on the coast of Maryland and Virginia.

USS Chincoteague, a 1,766-ton Barnegat class small seaplane tender, was built at Houghton, Washington, and was commissioned in April 1943. Chincoteague sailed from San Diego in June 1943 for Saboe Bay in the Santa Cruz Islands, where she tended seaplanes in support of operations in New Guinea. Less than two weeks after her arrival, she was badly damaged in multiple Japanese air attacks by a bomb hit in the after engine room and numerous near misses. She was towed back to the Mare Island Navy Yard, where repairs were completed in December 1943.

Chincoteague left Pearl Harbor in February 1944 and commenced a seven month period of duty in the western Pacific. She tended seaplanes and also carried freight, mail, and passengers in the Solomons, Marshalls, Gilberts, Marianas, and New Hebrides as well as in other locations. Following overhaul, she commenced salvage and rescue duty in the Palaus in December 1944 and in February 1945 joined the Iwo Jima assault force. After a period of duty at Ulithi she sailed in June 1945 for an overhaul at the Terminal Island repair facility at San Pedro, California. She tended seaplanes at Okinawa and at Tsingtao, China, between October 1945 and 1946 and then proceeded to Orange, Texas, for inactivation. She was decommissioned in December 1946.

In March 1949 Chincoteague was loaned to the Coast Guard as the cutter Chincoteague (WAVP-375, later WHEC-375). She served out of Norfolk, primarily on weather station duty. She was decommissioned in June 1972 and in the Vietnamization Program, she was transferred to South Vietnam Navy as HQ-5 TRAN BINH TRONG, she had participated in the Paracel Islands Battle on 19 January 1974 between South Vietnam Navy and China People Republic Navy, she was hit by heavy fire of the Chinese Hainan Class Submarine Chaser #274: 3 killed and 16 injured but successfully knocked out the chinese ship # 274 and returned to Da Nang Naval Base for emergency repair. After the Fall of South Vietnam in 1975, she had escaped from Vietnam to Subic Bay, Philippines with her crew. She became the Philippine Navy's Andreas Bonifacio in April 1976 and was decommissioned by them in June 1985.




VNN Logo   HQ-3 TRAN NHAT DUAT

Origin :
AVP-32 Yakutat
WAVP-380 / WHEC-380 Yakutat

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Barnegat - Small Seaplane Tender
Displacement: 1,766 t.(lt) 2,528 t.(fl)
Length 309' 10"
Beam 41'
Draft 12' 6"
Speed: 19.4 knots
USCG Complement 10 officers, 3 warrant officers, 138 enlisted Armament USN: one single 5"/38, one quad 40mm gun mount, two dual 40mm gun mounts, four dual 20mm gun mounts
Armament USCG: USCG one single 5"/38 MK 30-70 dual purpose gun mount, one MK 26 Mod 1 Fire Control Radar, one MK 10 Mod 1 A/S Projector, two MK32 Mod 5 torpedo Tubes
Electronics: Radar: SPS-23, SPS-29B; SPS-4B; SPS-52;
Sonar: SQS-1
Propulsion Fairbanks-Morse, direct reversing diesels, two shafts, 6,080hp

HQ3 Tran Nhat Duat

HISTORY

       Yakutat: A bay on the Southern Coast of Alaska.

USS Yakutat, a 1,766-ton Barnegat class small seaplane tender, was built at Seattle, Washington, and was commissioned in March 1944. She departed the West Coast for the Central Pacific in June 1944 and in July she began tending seaplanes at Saipan. She arrived in the Palau Islands one day after the landings at Pelelieu in September and serviced seaplanes there until November.

From December 1944 to March 1945 Yakutat shuttled between Ulithi, Guam, Saipan, the Palaus, and the Marianas, supporting seaplanes and providing transport services. In late March she moved forward to the Ryukyu Islands and set up a seaplane base at Kerama Retto in support of the Okinawa landings. Yakutat continued to support seaplanes there and at Okinawa through the end of the war. After two months of duty in Japan, she proceeded to the West Coast in November 1945 for inactivation. She was decommissioned in July 1946.

In August 1948 Yakutat was loaned to the Coast Guard as the cutter Yakutat (WAVP-380, later WHEC-380). She served out of New Bedford, Massachusetts, primarily on weather station duty. Participating in Coast Guard operations as part of Operation "Market Time" off the coast of Vietnam in 1967 and again in 1970 and 1971, Yakutat was also redesignated as a medium endurance cutter and given the alphanumeric hull number WHEC-380. Returned to the Navy in 1970, Yakutat was transferred to the Navy of the Republic of South Vietnam on 10 January 1971.

Renamed TRAN NHAT DUAT (HQ-03), the former seaplane tender and weather ship cooperated with units of the United States Navy on coastal patrol and counterinsurgency missions off the coast of embattled South Vietnam until the collapse of that country in the spring of 1975.

Fleeing to the Philippines, Tran Nhat Duat and her five sisterships of the former South Vietnamese Navy lay moored in Subic Bay awaiting disposition—ships without a country. The Philippine government, however, acquired the ships in 1975, and title was formally transferred on 6 April 1976. TRAN NHAT DUAT and her sistership. TRAN QUANG KHAI (HQ-02) (ex-USS Cook Inlet, WHEC-384 and AVP-36) were acquired only to be cannibalized for spare parts to keep the other four units of the class in operating condition.

Yakutat (AVP-32) received four battle stars for her World War II service. She also received one award of the Navy Unit Commendation, one award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, and four battle stars for Vietnam service while assigned to the United States Coast Guard.




VNN Logo   HQ-2 TRAN QUANG KHAI

Origin :
AVP-36 Cook Inlet
WAVP-384 / WHEC-384 Cook Inlet

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Barnegat - Small Seaplane Tender
Displacement: 1,766 t.(lt) 2,528 t.(fl)
Length 309' 10"
Beam 41'
Draft 12' 6"
Speed: 19.4 knots
USCG Complement 10 officers, 3 warrant officers, 138 enlisted Armament USN: one single 5"/38, one quad 40mm gun mount, two dual 40mm gun mounts, four dual 20mm gun mounts
Armament USCG: USCG one single 5"/38 MK 30-70 dual purpose gun mount, one MK 26 Mod 1 Fire Control Radar, one MK 10 Mod 1 A/S Projector, two MK32 Mod 5 torpedo Tubes
Electronics: Radar: SPS-23, SPS-29B; SPS-4B; SPS-52; Sonar: SQS-1
Propulsion Fairbanks-Morse, direct reversing diesels, two shafts, 6,080hp

HQ2 Tran Quang Khai

HISTORY

        Cook Inlet: An inlet in the coast of Alaska north of Kodiak.

Cook Inlet (AVP-36), a 1,766-ton Barnegat class small seaplane tender, was launched 13 May 1944 by Lake Washington Shipyards, Houghton, Wash.; sponsored by Mrs. H. K. Stubbs, wife of Captain Stubbs; commissioned 5 November 1944, Commander W. P. Woods in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

She left San Diego for the Central Pacific in January 1945 and, after a brief period tending seaplanes in Hawaii, arrived at Saipan in February. In March, Cook Inlet served as an air-sea rescue ship during the invasion of Iwo Jima and rescued 27 survivors of downed bombers.

Cook Inlet remained on duty off Iwo Jima until November 1945, when she moved to Jinsen (Inchon), Korea, to serve as station tender. She returned to San Francisco for inactivation in January 1946. Cook Inlet was placed "in commission in reserve" in June 1946 and was placed out of commission in 1947.

In September 1948 Cook Inlet was loaned to the Coast Guard as the cutter Cook Inlet (WAVP-384, later WHEC-384). She served out of Portland, Maine, primarily on weather station duty, for most of her Coast Guard career. She was transferred to South Vietnam as HQ-2 TRAN QUANG KHAI in December 1971. After the fall of South Vietnam, she was transferred to the Philippines in April 1976 as a source of spare parts for other ex-U.S. ships.




VNN Logo   HQ-4 TRAN KHANH DU

Origin: Ex-USS Forster (DE 334)

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Edsall
TYPE: FMR (geared diesel, Fairbanks-Morse reverse gear drive, 3" guns)
Displacement: 1,200 tons (std) 1,590 tons (full)
Dimensions: 306' (oa), 300' (wl) x 36' 10" x 12' 3" (max)
Armament: 3 x 3"/50 Mk22 (1x3), 1 twin 40mm Mk1 AA, 8 x 20mm Mk 4 AA, 3 x 21" Mk15 TT (3x1), 1 Hedgehog Projector Mk10 (144 rounds), 8 Mk6 depth charge projectors, 2 Mk9 depth charge tracks
Machinery: 4 Fairbanks-Morse Mod. 38d81/8 geared diesel engines, 4 diesel-generators, 6000 shp, 2 screws
Speed: 21 knots
Range: 9,100 nm @ 12 knots
Crew: 8 / 201

HQ4 Tran Khanh Du

HISTORY

       FORSTER (DE-334) was launched 13 November 1943 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex.; sponsored by Mrs. E. W. Forster, widow of Machinist Forster (in memory of her husband that he lost his life in action on the USS VINCENNES CA-44, sunk in the battle of Savo Island, 9 August 1942); and commissioned 25 January 1944, Lieutenant Commander I. E. Davis, USNR, in command. She was reclassified DER-334 on 21 October 1955.

Beginning her convoy escort duty in the Atlantic, FORSTER sailed from Norfolk 23 March 1944 in a convoy bound for Bizerte. Off the north African coast 11 April, her group came under heavy attack from German bombers, several of which FORSTER splashed. When destroyer escort HOLDER (DE-401) was torpedoed during the air attack, FORSTER stood by the stricken ship, firing a protective antiaircraft cover and taking off her wounded.

FORSTER returned to New York 11 May 1944, and during the next year, made six voyages across the Atlantic to escort convoys to Bizerte, England, and France. Between these missions, she served as school ship for precommissioning crews for new construction and gave escort services along the east coast and to Bermuda. On 20 June 1945, she sailed from New York for training in Chesapeake and Guantanamo Bays en route to San Diego and Pearl Harbor, where she arrived 25 July.

FORSTER departed Pearl Harbor 30 August 1945 for occupation duty in the western Pacific, primarily escort assignments between the Marianas and Japan. She sailed for home from Guam 9 January 1946, reaching Philadelphia 12 February. FORSTER was decommissioned and placed in reserve at Green Cove Springs 15 June 1946.

Between 20 June 1951 and 25 May 1954, FORSTER was in commission in the Coast Guard, serving on weather station duty out of Honolulu, and once voyaging to Japan. She returned to reserve in naval custody until recommissioned at Long Beach, Calif., 23 October 1956. After training, she joined Escort Squadron 5 at Seattle, Wash., for radar picket duty in the continental air defense system. She continued similar duty from Pearl Harbor, her home port from 20 June 1958, serving in the Pacific Barrier, a distant early warning line of picket ships and aircraft operating from Hawaii to Alaska. Through 1962, FORSTER alternated periods on demanding patrol duty with necessary maintenance at Pearl Harbor, occasionally calling at Alaskan ports. FORSTER received one battle star for World War II service.

Transferred on 25 September 1971 to South Vietnam Navy in the Vietnamization Program, FORSTER was renamed frigate TRAN KHANH DU (HQ-04). Participated in the Paracel Islands Battle on 19 January 1974 between 4 South Vietnam Navy ships and 11 China People Republic Navy ships, she had sunk a Chinese Submarine Chaser, Hainan Class #271, she had then escorted RVN HQ-16 LY THUONG KIET, heavy damaged under fire to Da Nang Naval Base for an emergency repair. In a shipyard, in overhaul, when Saigon fell on 29 April 1975, she was captured by North Vietnamese forces and written off by the U.S. Navy as "Transferred to Vietnam, 30 April 1975."

Renamed DAI KY (HQ-03), she was still seaworthy in 1997 and was used as a training ship. By 1999, she was reduced to an alongside training hulk.




VNN Logo   HQ-1 TRAN HUNG DAO

Origin: Ex-USS Camp (FFR 251 / DE 251)

SPECIFICATION:


CLASS: Edsall
TYPE: FMR (geared diesel, Fairbanks-Morse reverse gear drive, 3" guns)
Displacement: 1,200 tons (std) 1,590 tons (full)
Dimensions: 306' (oa), 300' (wl) x 36' 10" x 12' 3" (max)
Armament: 3 x 3"/50 Mk22 (1x3), 1 twin 40mm Mk1 AA, 8 x 20mm Mk 4 AA, 3 x 21" Mk15 TT (3x1), 1 Hedgehog Projector Mk10 (144 rounds), 8 Mk6 depth charge projectors, 2 Mk9 depth charge tracks
Machinery: 4 Fairbanks-Morse Mod. 38d81/8 geared diesel engines, 4 diesel-generators, 6000 shp, 2 screws
Speed: 21 knots
Range: 9,100 nm @ 12 knots
Crew: 8 / 201

HQ1 Tran Hung Dao

HISTORY

       CAMP (DE-251) was launched 16 April 1943 by Brown Shipbuilding Co., Houston, Tex.; sponsored by Mrs. O. H. Camp (in memory of her husband, a naval aviator; attached to Patrol Squadron 44, Ensign Camp was killed in action 7 June 1942 during the Battle of Midway); commissioned 16 September 1943, Lieutenant Commander P. B. Mavor, USCG, in command; and reported to the Atlantic Fleet.

After duty as school ship for precommissioning crews for other escort vessels, CAMP cleared Norfolk, Va., 14 December 1943, escorting a convoy bound for Casablanca with men and supplies for the operations in Italy. CAMP returned to Norfolk 24 January 1944 to begin a year and a half of convoy escort operations from New York to ports of the United Kingdom, guarding convoys whose ships brought troops and mountains of equipment and supplies for the buildup and support of the assault on the European continent. Fighting the foul weather common in the North Atlantic, CAMP's alertness against submarine attack and diligence were rewarded by no losses in any of the convoys she accompanied.

A collision with a merchantman, in which one of CAMP's crew members was killed, required a repair period during which CAMP received a new bow and acquired 5" guns; otherwise her escort duty was uninterrupted until 19 June 1945.

CAMP cleared Charleston, S.C., 9 July 1945 for the Pacific, and after serving as a training ship at Pearl Harbor, proceeded to Eniwetok for occupation duty. She supervised the evacuation of the Japanese garrison from Mili, then took on air-sea rescue duties off Kwajalein until 4 November, when she sailed for home, arriving at New York 10 December. She was decommissioned 1 May 1946.

Reclassified DER-251 on 7 December 1955, CAMP was recommissioned 31 July l956 for duty as radar picket ship in the early warning system. She reported to Newport, R.I., 19 February 1957 and operated from that port to Argentia, Newfoundland, and into the North Atlantic through 1960.

In 1965, her large radar antenna was removed and CAMP was sent to Indo-China for coastal patrol and interdiction by the US Navy (Operation Market Time). Following the US Withdrawal Program in the Vietnam War, she was transferred to South Vietnam on 6 February 1971, many more equipment was deleted and removed from the ship. Renamed frigate TRAN HUNG DAO (HQ-01), the ship was stricken from the US Navy Register on 30 December 1975. Following the surrender of the South Vietnamese government on 29 April 1975, TRAN HUNG DAO escaped to the Philippines which acquired the ship later that year.

Formally transferred on 5 April 1976, former TRAN HUNG DAO was commissioned into the Philippine Navy as frigate RAJAH LAKANDULA (PS-4). Deleted in 1988, she was retained and acted as a stationary headquarters ship as recently as 1995.

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